6 things you should never store on your work computer                                            

If you're storing personal material on your work computer, you could be setting yourself up for some serious trouble.

 "As a general rule of thumb, keep all your work and private computer use separate," Michael Kerr, an international business speaker and author of "The Humor Advantage," told Business Insider. "If necessary, ask what is permissible and use a portable flash drive to store any private items you need to access from a work computer."

 Kerr said that, while laws vary between jurisdiction, your company may have rules about computer use. When it comes down to it, it's better to err on the side of caution.

 "It protects you and your firm," management expert Andrew Wittman told Business Insider. "If you take work home and use a laptop, dedicate a laptop for work."

 He said that during his career in law enforcement, he witnessed an occasion where a police officer's professional notebook was admitted as evidence in a trial.

 "He had notes from several cases and lots and lots of personal items," Wittman said. "Beyond embarrassing, it opened him and the department up to potential liability."

 Wittman said that the same thing can happen to anyone if they store personal items on their work computer.

 Here are some items you should avoid storing on your work device:

                                          


Slide 2 of 7: <p> "Your work computer is for work," <a href="http://www.resumewritersink.com/">Résumé Writers' Ink</a> founder and career expert Tina Nicolai told Business Insider. "It's always smart to keep personal separate from business. You're not getting paid for your personal time."</p><p> So saving password lists, banking information, kids' school transcripts, medical records, or personal photos is generally a bad idea. It could send the wrong signal to your employer.</p><p> Kerr also said that your supervisors may be concerned about you consuming valuable storage space and putting the device at risk for viruses.</p><p> Plus, if you lose your job, you could also lose your information forever.</p><p> "If you're ever let go from a company, standard policy is to have you leave immediately," Ryan Kahn, a career coach, founder of <a href="http://hiredgroup.com/">The Hired Group</a>, and author of "<a href="http://www.amazon.com/Hired-The-Guide-Recent-Grad-ebook/dp/B00507GMCS?tag=bisafetynet-20">Hired! The Guide for the Recent Grad,</a>" told Business Insider. "You probably won't have the time to remove files that should have never been on your work computer in the first place."</p>                                         

Personal photos or videos

 "Your work computer is for work," Résumé Writers' Ink founder and career expert Tina Nicolai told Business Insider. "It's always smart to keep personal separate from business. You're not getting paid for your personal time."

 So saving password lists, banking information, kids' school transcripts, medical records, or personal photos is generally a bad idea. It could send the wrong signal to your employer.

 Kerr also said that your supervisors may be concerned about you consuming valuable storage space and putting the device at risk for viruses.

 Plus, if you lose your job, you could also lose your information forever.

 "If you're ever let go from a company, standard policy is to have you leave immediately," Ryan Kahn, a career coach, founder of The Hired Group, and author of "Hired! The Guide for the Recent Grad," told Business Insider. "You probably won't have the time to remove files that should have never been on your work computer in the first place."


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